Potential Problem Areas widget - Metasys - LIT-12011953 - Server - Metasys UI - 7.0.50

Metasys UI Help

Brand
Metasys
Product name
Metasys UI
Document type
User Guide
Document number
LIT-12011953
Version
7.0.50
Revision date
2024-03-19
Product status
Active
Language
English

Who can access the Potential Problem Areas widget?

You do not require a license to access the Points tab of the widget, unless you use an Open Application Server (OAS). For an OAS, you require the Metasys Potential Problem Areas license to access Potential Problem Areas Points. The widget itself may additionally include two separate licensable features, namely Fault Detection and Fault Triage. You require the Metasys Fault Detection and the Metasys Fault Triage licenses to access both Fault Detection and Fault Triage. You can use Fault Detection without a Fault Triage license, but you require both licenses for Fault Detection and Fault Triage to use Fault Triage.

Note: For Metasys UI on an OAS, the Potential Problem Areas widget is not added to dashboards by default. To add the Potential Problem Areas widget to the dashboards, open the Dashboards Manager and add the Potential Problem Areas widget once it is licensed.
Note: Fault Detection and Fault Triage are not included with any server. You must purchase these features separately.
Note: The OAS Turnkey does not meet the minimum requirements to run the Fault Detection and Fault Triage features.
Note: For MVE on Metasys UI, see Potential Problem Areas (PPA) widget for MVE on Metasys UI for more information.
Important: After licensing the Fault Detection feature and the Fault Triage feature, there is a brief delay before the faults become visible. Log out of Metasys UI and back in, if you were logged in when the feature was licensed.
The following table outlines the various combinations of licenses and feature availability and behavior.
Table 1. Potential Problem Areas feature availability and behavior by license
License Feature availability and behavior
Potential Problem Areas Fault Detect-ion1 Fault Triage2 Potential Problem Areas widget Points tab Faults tab Fault list order and catego-rization Worst fault rollup Fault sup-pression Fault occur-rence Fault duration Fault Triage Fault Manager
No 3 No No
No No Yes
No Yes No 4 S 5
No Yes Yes 4 S, O, D 6
Yes 7 No No 8
Yes No Yes 8
Yes Yes No S 5
Yes Yes Yes S, O, D 6
Note: Whenever both the Potential Problem Areas Points and Faults are licensed, the Faults tab becomes the default tab. Simply click on the Points tab to view Points.

How current is the data in the Faults tab?

The system gathers data and creates faults approximately every 60 minutes on the hour, but in the Potential Problem Areas widget you see the faults at the time of page load only. You can refresh the browser to display the updated data. This action refreshes the list after the next periodic event has occurred.

Why don't I see any faults?

There can be several reasons why you may not see any faults. First, make sure that all criteria are met for a given fault. When no faults occur, it is likely that a short name was not properly mapped to its semantic data point model. If your site uses point names that deviate from the Johnson Controls standard, you may need to use the Point Setting file in SCT to configure your point short names. See the Updating point settings section in System Configuration Tool Help (LIT-12011964) for more information.

What is fault suppression?

If there is a fault associated with an Air Handling Unit (AHU), there is presumably a problem with downstream terminal units. In an effort to minimize the fault list to a size that is manageable, the fault suppression functionality filters the downstream faults and shows you the associated parent faults only. You need to address those faults first in any event to ensure that the associated downstream faults are actual issues at the terminal unit. Fault suppression creates a short, succinct list of faults and this makes the troubleshooting process more efficient.
Note: Equipment serving relationships are required for the suppression feature. Also, the served system fault must be within the fault duration of the serving system fault in order for suppression to occur. A VAV which faults before an AHU fault will not be suppressed by the AHU fault and show up in the fault list.
The following table describes the suppression relationship between fault rules. YES indicates that a fault is suppressed by a fault rule. - indicates that a fault is not suppressed by another fault rule.
Table 4. Fault suppression relationships
Suppressing fault rules Suppressed fault rules
  VAV Insufficient Heating Capacity VAV Insufficient Flow Capacity VAV Low Zone Temperature VAV High Zone Temperature VAV High Flow VAV Low Flow VAV Zone CO2 Level is Too High VAV Zone Humidity is Outside of Comfort Limits
AHU Insufficient Heating Capacity YES - YES - - - - YES
AHU Not Running when Occupied - YES - - - YES - YES
AHU Mixed Air Dampers are Stuck Closed - - - - - - YES -
AHU High Supply Pressure YES - YES - YES - - -
AHU Insufficient Fan Capacity - YES - YES - YES YES YES
AHU Zone CO2 Level is Too High - - - - - - YES -
AHU Low Supply Pressure - YES - YES - YES YES YES
AHU Low Discharge Air Temperature YES - YES - - - - YES
AHU High Discharge Air Temperature - - - YES - - - YES
AHU Outdoor Air Minimum Flow is Too Low - - - - - - YES -
AHU Return CO2 Level is Too High - - - - - - YES -
AHU Low Return Air Temperature YES - YES - - - - YES
AHU High Return Air Temperature - - - YES - - - YES
AHU Humidity Setpoint is Outside of Comfort Limits - - - - - - - YES
AHU Return Humidity is Outside of Comfort Limits - - - - - - - YES

How does the Suppressed Faults filter in the Faults tab work?

You can select the Suppressed Faults filter only in combination with the fault types filters AHU and VAV only. You can also select the Suppressed Faults filter in combination with the various rank filters. The following table outlines the behavior of the Suppressed Faults filter in more detail:
Table 5. Faults displayed by suppression filter combination
Filters Displayed faults
AHU VAV Critical High Medium Low  
Selected - - - - - Selected AHU faults and suppressed VAV faults
- Selected - - - - Selected VAV faults and suppressed VAV faults
- - Selected - - - Selected All faults, including suppressed, that are critical
- -   Selected - - Selected All faults, including suppressed, that are high
- - - - Selected - Selected All faults, including suppressed, that are medium
- - - - - Selected Selected All faults, including suppressed, that are low
- - - - - - - Any non-suppressed faults that match other selected filters, such as FCU and RTU

Is the Potential Problem Areas widget supported on all devices?

Yes, the Potential Problem Areas widget is supported on desktop, tablets, and smartphones.

What is Fault Triage?

Fault Triage provides a unique view, which provides additional information on a particular fault, corrective actions in the order of their likeliness to resolve the issue, a description of the fault, charting of supporting data, and an activity log to track progress. Fault Triage also enhances the sorting order and information in the Faults tab of the Potential Problem Areas widget to introduce fault occurrences and durations to better drive the most problematic issues to the top of the list.

Accessing Fault Triage

You require both the Metasys Fault Detection and the Metasys Fault Triage license to access the feature.
Note: For MVE on Metasys UI, refer to Licensing for MVE sites versus non-MVE sites for more information.

How can I access Fault Triage?

  1. Navigate to the Potential Problem Areas widget on the Space dashboard.
  2. In the Faults tab, click or tap the hyperlinked fault that you want to investigate.
  3. The Fault Triage window opens in a new tab.

What is the layout of the Fault Triage window?

The following figure and table outline the layout of the Fault Triage window.
Figure 3. Fault Triage layout
Table 6. Fault Triage callouts

Number

Name

Description

1

Details

This section shows the affected equipment and spaces served by the equipment, including hyperlinks to the relevant equipment and space(s). It also shows the total duration of all fault occurrences within the previous seven days, and the total occurrences of the fault within the previous seven days.

As an Administrator user, you can also access the Fault Manager from the Details section. See What is the Fault Manager? for more information about viewing fault rules, managing global attributes, and using the Import and Export feature.

As an Administrator user, you can click or tap the Disable menu (three vertical dots) to display a menu, which gives you the ability to disable this fault rule for this equipment, disable all fault rules for this equipment, and disable this fault rule for all equipment.

Note: When you disable a fault rule for all equipment, the rule is disabled, but the exceptions table in the Fault Manager does not list the equipment for which the rule is disabled.

2

Possible Causes

Any given fault can occur as a result of a number of given root causes. A group of a half dozen Johnson Controls HVAC Controls technical experts from across North America with a combined experience of over 150 years provided the following input for the Fault Triage feature:
  • A list of the most common possible causes for any given fault.
  • The likeliness of any given possible cause based on their individual experiences.
  • Corrective actions for the possible causes.
    WARNING
    Recommendations for corrective action are not a guarantee of fault resolution; always follow applicable safety procedures and, when necessary, contact your JCI representative for assistance.

See How do I take action on a fault? for more information.

3

Fault Name and Description

This section shows you the fault name and the criteria that must be met for the fault to occur. See What types of fault rules are there? What data is required for each fault to occur? for a list of all fault names and corresponding criteria. See also How do I modify fault rule attributes in the Fault Manager? to learn more about changing global attributes.

4

Charting

This is an auto-generated chart that is provided with each fault occurrence. The chart displays pertinent data before, during, and after the fault occurs.

Use the arrow buttons to see data from each fault occurrence. The first page displays the most recent fault.

Stacked charting provides the following information, as appropriate:

  • Top chart – Process variable and setpoint(s)
  • Middle chart – Analog outputs
  • Bottom chart – Binary or enumerated outputs
Note: Line marker fill colors are colored to indicate non-normal status. Tool tips provide a list of all the data at that point in time. You can hide or unhide individual data points.

See What information is provided in the Fault Triage trend charts for each fault? and How does Fault Triage charting differ from Trends or from a Trend Study? for more information.

5

Activity

This log shows the fault occurrences, including the date and time it first occurred, along with the fault duration of that occurrence. The log also shows the corrective action progress, as any corrective action marked TRIED or SOLVED ISSUE appears with the user name and time stamp. You can also see user notes, which can give you more information about an issue and corrective actions. Click +ADD NOTE to add a user note.

Note: The Equipment Activity widget and System Activity do not display activity items for faults.

How do I take action on a fault?

  1. Click or tap on a fault listed in the Potential Problem Areas widget. The Fault Triage window opens in a new tab.
  2. In the Fault Triage window, navigate to the Possible Causes section.
  3. Expand the possible causes to see further causes and suggested corrective actions.
  4. Try the corrective actions as appropriate.
  5. Click or tap NOT TRIED, TRIED, and SOLVED ISSUE to log your action. The action log displays in the Activity section in the lower right of your screen.
  6. It is also best practice to add a note in the Activity log, especially when the possible cause was Other.

For example, the fault AHU Low Discharge Air Temperature can be caused by Heating is not working properly, and that in turn can be caused by Dirty coil (exterior). Fault Triage suggests to Clean exterior of coil to rated pressure drop. If you believe this to have been the root cause of the fault then mark the solution with SOLVED ISSUE. The selection persists until the fault reoccurs, but the instance of the fault is removed from the list after seven days. If indeed cleaning the coil was not the root cause, or if other factors were involved, the fault will reappear in the fault list within seven days after being marked solved with a status of Reoccurred. The previous selections on other root causes will be persisted and the Clean exterior of coil to rated pressure drop selection will be automatically marked as TRIED.

What is the Fault Manager?

The Fault Manager is closely linked to Fault Triage. You can view, enable, and disable all fault rules in the Fault Manager. You can modify global attributes and you can also download an archive of global attributes, exceptions, and activity logs, and you can import an archive to restore data from a previous archive.

Who can access the Fault Manager?

Only Administrator users can access the Fault Manager. You also require the Metasys Fault Detection license to access the Fault Manager.

How can I access the Fault Manager?

  1. Open the User menu.
  2. Tap or click Feature Management.
  3. Tap or click Fault Manager.

You can also access the Fault Manager in the Details section of the Fault Triage window.

What is fault severity and how is it used?

To find out about fault severity go to the Fault Manager first, as the Fault Manager lists the fault rules based on severity. The worst faults are at the top of the list, while minor faults, such as energy saving opportunities, are listed towards the bottom of the list.

The order of the faults in the Faults tab of the Potential Problem Areas widget is also by severity, if Fault Triage is not licensed. When Fault Triage is licensed, the fault duration and occurrences are also factored into the order of the faults displayed in the Faults tab of the Potential Problem Areas widget.

The following figure shows the difference between the Potential Problem Areas widget when Fault Triage is not licensed and when it is licensed, respectively.
Figure 4. Potential Problem Areas widget view comparison
The following table lists the fault rules by severity.
Table 7. Fault rules by severity
  Rule Severity Color
1 AHU Mixed Air Dampers are Stuck Open Critical Red
2 AHU Insufficient Heating Capacity
3 AHU Not Running when Occupied
4 AHU Mixed Air Dampers are Stuck Closed
5 AHU High Supply Pressure
6 AHU Insufficient Fan Capacity
7 AHU Zone CO2 Level is Too High High Orange
8 AHU Low Supply Pressure
9 AHU Low Discharge Air Temperature
10 AHU High Discharge Air Temperature
11 AHU Building Static Pressure is Too Low
12 AHU Building Static Pressure is Too High
13 AHU Outdoor Air Minimum Flow is Too Low
14 AHU Return CO2 Level is Too High
15 AHU Low Return Air Temperature
16 AHU Low Zone Temperature
17 AHU High Return Air Temperature
18 AHU High Zone Temperature
19 AHU Outdoor Air Minimum Flow is Too High
20 AHU Zone Humidity is Outside of Comfort Limits
21 AHU Return Humidity Outside of Comfort Limits
22 RTU Insufficient Heating Capacity
23 RTU Not Running when Occupied
24 RTU Zone CO2 Level is Too High
25 RTU Low Discharge Air Temperature
26 RTU High Discharge Air Temperature
27 RTU Return CO2 Level is Too High
28 RTU Low Return Air Temperature Medium Yellow
29 RTU High Return Air Temperature
30 RTU Low Zone Temperature
31 RTU High Zone Temperature
32 RTU Zone Humidity is Outside of Comfort Limits
33 RTU Return Humidity is Outside of Comfort Limits
34 FCU Insufficient Heating Capacity
35 FCU Low Zone Temperature
36 FCU High Zone Temperature
37 VAV Insufficient Heating Capacity
38 VAV Insufficient Flow Capacity
39 VAV Low Zone Temperature
40 VAV High Zone Temperature
41 VAV High Flow
42 VAV Low Flow
43 VAV Zone CO2 Level is Too High
44 VAV Zone Humidity is Outside of Comfort Limits
45 AHU Humidity Setpoint is Outside of Comfort Limits Low Gray
46 AHU Mechanically Cooling without using Economizer
47 AHU Constantly Running
48 AHU Return Temperature Heating Setpoint is Too High
49 AHU Zone Temperature Heating Setpoint is Too High
50 AHU Return Temperature Cooling Setpoint is Too Low
51 AHU Zone Temperature Cooling Setpoint is Too Low
52 RTU Humidity Setpoint is Outside of Comfort Limits
53 RTU Mechanically Cooling without using Economizer
54 RTU Constantly Running
55 RTU Return Temperature Heating Setpoint is Too High
56 RTU Return Temperature Cooling Setpoint is Too Low
57 RTU Zone Temperature Heating Setpoint is Too High
58 RTU Zone Temperature Cooling Setpoint is Too Low
59 FCU Simultaneously Heating and Cooling
60 FCU Heating or Cooling While a Window is Open
61 FCU A Window is Open While Unoccupied
62 FCU Zone Temperature Heating Setpoint is Too High
63 FCU Zone Temperature Cooling Setpoint is Too Low
64 VAV Zone Temperature Heating Setpoint is Too High
65 VAV Zone Temperature Cooling Setpoint is Too Low

How do I learn more about a fault rule and its exceptions in the Fault Manager?

  1. Click or tap on a fault rule listed in the FAULT RULES column. The FAULT RULE window opens.
  2. Review the details about what triggers this rule, the attributes of the rule, and the exceptions of the rule.
    Note: An exception is a piece of equipment for which a rule is disabled.

How can I turn a fault rule on or off?

This can be done in multiple ways:

  • With the Disable menu (three vertical dots), which is displayed next to a Fault in the Potential Problem Areas widget Faults tab, if you are logged in as an Administrator user.
  • With the Disable menu (three vertical dots), which is displayed in the Details section of Fault Triage, if you are logged in as an Administrator user.
  • With the ENABLE/DISABLE toggles in the Fault Manager. You can perform this action on a rule-by-rule basis, or in bulk by using the toggle in the header.
  • With the ENABLE/DISABLE toggle in the FAULT RULE window in the Fault Manager.
Note: When you disable a fault rule for all equipment, the rule is disabled, but the exceptions table in the Fault Manager does not list the equipment for which the rule is disabled.

How do I enable exceptions (equipment that has been disabled) in the Fault Manager?

  1. Click or tap on a fault rule listed in the FAULT RULES column. The FAULT RULE window opens.
  2. Navigate to the exceptions table at the bottom of the window.
  3. Select the equipment that you want to enable the fault for.
  4. Click or tap the toggle in the ENABLE/DISABLE column as appropriate.
  5. Click SAVE to save your changes.

How do I filter fault rules in the Fault Manager?

  1. Click or tap FILTER in the upper-right corner of the screen.
  2. Select the equipment type(s) that you want to filter for.

How do I modify fault rule attributes in the Fault Manager?

  1. Click or tap GLOBAL ATTRIBUTES in the upper-right corner of the screen. The GLOBAL ATTRIBUTES SETTINGS window opens.
  2. Hover your cursor over the attribute to see a description of the attribute.
  3. Hover your cursor over the faults data in the ASSIGNED TO column to check the fault rules that this attribute relates to.
    Important: Changes to an attribute affect all assigned to fault rules.
  4. Change the value in the VALUE column.
  5. Click or tap SAVE to keep and save your changes.
    Note: Click or tap RESET VALUES to revert your changes to the default values. The default values take into account rounding and calibration values typically found in the field.

How do I import backed up Fault Manager data?

You can import a Fault Manager archive to restore data from a previous archive.
Important: An import overwrites existing data.
  1. Click ARCHIVE in the upper-right corner of the Fault Manger. The ARCHIVE window opens.
  2. Click Choose File and select the .archive file you want to import.
  3. Click IMPORT.

What is the difference between a Metasys alarm and a Metasys fault?

Alarm: Alarm extensions provide a way to notify a user when system points exceed configured thresholds. You can manually enter thresholds or you can base the thresholds on an additional point, such as a control setpoint. The thresholds can also include reporting delays. The Alarm Manager handles management of alarms, including acknowledgment, discards, and annotations.

Fault: Faults can utilize more system points, delays, and thresholds that are directly related to each individual fault. Faults are not included in Alarm Management, but in the Potential Problem Areas widget.

The following table outlines the differences between an alarm and a fault in more detail.
Table 8. Differences between an alarm and a fault
Aspects Alarm Fault
Logic Finite data, thresholds, and delays Expanded and focused data, thresholds, and delays
Sample time Exact Binning: all data samples are put in five minute bins. For example, if a fault occurs at 12:03 it is registered in the 12:00 bin.
Detection frequency Immediately annunciated by the event Events are evaluated at fixed intervals. Faults are evaluated at fixed intervals.
Notification Immediate through the alarm icon and entry in Alarm Manager or Alarm Monitor Fixed interval on Potential Problem Areas widget Faults tab, rolling seven days
Prioritization Alarm priority Fault severity, Fault rank
Management Alarm Manager: acknowledge, discard, or annotate alarms
  • Potential Problem Areas widget and Fault Manager: enable, disable fault rules
  • Fault Triage: take corrective actions in the order of their likeliness to resolve the issue

Although alarms and faults are similar, faults provide a "smarter" indication of building system issues. Utilizing both faults and alarms within your Metasys system can increase productivity and greatly minimize nuisance problem reporting. A fault can help you determine if an alarm is justified. You can use the fault findings to fine tune the alarm settings. When you manage a site, consider looking more closely at faults and reserve alarms for reporting issues that are truly alarming.

For example, regarding a temperature threshold, you can eliminate nuisance and spurious alarms by using faults to determine if a piece of equipment is still failing to achieve setpoint after it has had time to ramp up to a stable state. You can then create alarms for the space, which detect real emergencies.

What types of fault rules are there? What data is required for each fault to occur?

The following table outlines the fault rules and the semantic point model required for each fault to occur. You may need to use the Point Setting file in SCT to configure your point short names. See the Updating point settings section in System Configuration Tool Help (LIT-12011964) for more information.
Table 9. Fault rules summary
Fault Rule All of the following criteria must be met in order for the respective fault to occur 9 Required semantic point model
AHU Building Static Pressure is Too High
  1. The Supply Fan must be running for a minimum of the Minimum Equipment Start Time Delay time
  2. The Building Static Pressure must be greater than the Building Static Pressure Setpoint multiplied by one plus the Building Static Pressure Error Comparison divided by 100 for longer than the Minimum Fault Time Delay time
  • Building Static Pressure
  • Building Static Pressure Setpoint
  • Supply Fan Status or Supply Fan Command
AHU Building Static Pressure is Too Low
  1. The Supply Fan must be running for a minimum of the Minimum Equipment Start Time Delay time
  2. The Building Static Pressure must be less than the Building Static Pressure Setpoint multiplied by one minus the Building Static Pressure Error Comparison divided by 100 for longer than the Minimum Fault Time Delay time
  • Building Static Pressure
  • Building Static Pressure Setpoint
  • Supply Fan Status or Supply Fan Command
AHU Constantly Running This fault occurs any time that the Supply Fan is running for longer than the Equipment Excessive Runtime time. It is intended to identify systems which should be shutting down and not doing so. Disable this fault for any systems which must always run.
  • Supply Fan Status or Supply Fan Command
AHU High Discharge Air Temperature 10
  1. The Supply Fan must be running for a minimum of the Minimum Equipment Start Time Delay time
  2. The Discharge Air Temperature must be greater than the sum of the Discharge Air Temperature Setpoint and the Discharge Air Temperature Error for longer than the Minimum Fault Time Delay time
  • Discharge Air Temperature
  • Effective Discharge Air Temperature Setpoint or Discharge Air Temperature Setpoint
  • Supply Fan Status or Supply Fan Command
AHU High Return Air Temperature 10
  1. The Supply Fan must be running for a minimum of the Minimum Equipment Start Time Delay time
  2. The Return Air Temperature must be greater than the sum of the Return Air Temperature Setpoint and the Return Air Temperature Error for longer than the Minimum Fault Time Delay time
  • Return Air Temperature
  • Effective Cooling Temperature Setpoint or Return Air Temperature Setpoint
    Note: Return Air Temperature Setpoint must be present.
  • Supply Fan Status or Supply Fan Command
AHU High Supply Pressure
  1. The Supply Fan must be running for a minimum of the Minimum Equipment Start Time Delay time
  2. The lowest Discharge Air Pressure must be greater than the Effective Discharge Air Pressure Setpoint multiplied by one plus the Discharge Air Pressure Error Comparison divided by 100 for longer than the Minimum Fault Time Delay time
  • Effective Discharge Air Static Pressure or Discharge Air Static Pressure (lowest)
  • Discharge Air Static Pressure Setpoint
  • Supply Fan Status or Supply Fan Command